4/19/2008

Día Pangea, películas por el mundo y para el mundo

En el evento anual TED (Technology, Entertainment and Design, es decir, Tecnología, Entretenimiento y Diseño) se entregan unos premios muy especiales. Dos o tres personas y sus proyectos son seleccionadas cada año. Además de un buen pizco de dinero, se les pide una cosa muy curiosa: que pidan un deseo a la elitista comunidad de empresarios, científicos, emprendedores y mecenas que asisten a esa conferencia.

Así ha surgido el Día Pangea, tras un deseo pedido por Jehane Noujaim, directora de cine: que hubiese un día en que la humanidad se uniese mediante una película. Ese día será el 10 de Mayo de 2008,




Hoy me ha llegado un correo de TED en el que me invitan, como a tantos otros, a participar en el evento, e incluso a formar comunidades para ver en vivo (si estás ese día en Londres, Los Angeles, Río de Janeiro, Kigali, Mumbai, Cairo), vía televisión por cable, o vía internet, algunas de las películas que se van a emitir. El trailer está muy bien hecho, y desde la página de Pangea podéis seleccionar subtítulos en español. Aquí os dejo la versión de YouTube.




Ese día, se emitirán 20 cortos, de entre 2 y 15 minutos, sobre el ser humano y su papel en el mundo. Además, se emitirán comentarios cortos de científicos, directores de cine, filósofos, ... mensajes cortos sobre problemas enormes. Tiene una pinta excelente, y merece la pena dedicarle un ratito. Como dice su eslogan, una película no puede cambiar el mundo, pero la gente que la ve, sí.

Yo no podré participar en el Día Pangea, pero si alguien puede dedicarle ese día, seguro que merecerá la pena. Si no, seguro que unos días después tendremos la oportunidad de ver esas películas "en diferido" :)

En lo que resta de este post, os adjunto el mensaje completo de TED, que está redactado con más cuidado y tiempo que lo mío :)

Dear Friends of TED,

Wherever you will be on Saturday May 10, Pangea Day, you are warmly invited to join me and countless others around the world for a powerful, first-of-its kind experience.

Gathered in homes, movie theaters and larger venues, we will participate in a remarkable program of films and talks -- a kind of super-charged, marathon TED session -- celebrating our common humanity. If you think of yourself as something of a global soul, it could be one of the year's highlights. And in fact you could play an invaluable role in helping it realize its full potential...

If you don't have time to read this now, please just calendar Pangea Day for Saturday, May 10th (11am-3pm US West Coast, 2-6pm US East Coast, 7-11pm in UK, 8pm-midnight in Europe and much of Africa, 9pm-1am in the Mideast, 11.30pm-3.30am India, etc.).

On that day, we invite you to gather around a screen with your family, friends and neighbors, preferably from more than one country. Pangea Day will be available on TV in many areas of the world. In the US, the full four-hour program is being carried live on Current TV, available in 41 million homes on the major cable and satellite systems. Current TV pioneered the vision of citizen-empowered media, and we're delighted to be partnering with them. We have similar agreements with the massive satellite network Star TV in China/India/Asia, with MGM Networks in Latin America, with Sky in the UK, several partners in the Mid-East, not to mention Indonesia, Mexico, New Zealand and many more. Full details will be posted on our website next week.

And thanks to partnerships with Akamai and MSN, we will also be available on a live, full-screen web-stream everywhere with a broadband Internet connection.

The best way to watch Pangea Day is not just as a normal TV show or web-stream. It should be watched as a community event. We want the sense of the great global village gathering around a campfire. We already know of more than a thousand self-organized screenings taking place in homes, clubs, and movie theaters. We expect thousands more come May 10.

As many of you know, the day is the result of the combined efforts of countless TED supporters around the world, inspired by the TED Prize wish of film-maker Jehane Noujaim. She dreamed of a day when people around the world could share the the same film experience at the same time. The idea has grown into a giant global project... thanks to you. To get a sense of the scale of ambition, please take a minute to watch this beautiful trailer.

Here's the state of play:
- Out of thousands of submissions, we have assembled a fantastic line-up of films. There are about 20 in total, ranging in length from 2 to 15 minutes (most of them around 5). They all tell powerful stories, often without language, of what it is to be human. They are, by turns, funny, touching, dramatic, inspiring.
- But you won't just be watching films. You'll be watching the world watching. We're bringing in live audience images from around the world. Watching a film about reconciliation is one thing. Watching it while simultaneously witnessing the reactions of people who are supposed to hate each other will be something else altogether.
- The day also features a dozen powerful three-minute talks from scientists, film-makers, story-tellers and global visionaries. Just as a session at TED takes us on a journey stimulating every part of our brains, so will Pangea Day. Don't dismiss it as a warm & fuzzy peace-fest. The project builds on the latest ideas in anthropology, psychology and technology. We'll be revealing how.
- The whole program is being broadcast in front of a live audience of 1,000 (from more than 50 countries) at a spectacular set being built at a Sony Studios soundstage in Los Angeles.
- It will look and feel like nothing you've seen before.

If any of this excites you, please would you consider doing something to help the day realize its full potential. There are three specific things you can do.

1) Make firm plans to participate on May 10th. As a friend of TED, you can apply for free tickets to our main satellite-connected locations in LA, London, Rio de Janeiro, Kigali, Cairo or Mumbai. If you know you can bring a group of at least six people who will commit to being there for the full program, please write to pangeadaytickets@gmail.com.
Or, attend one of the other screenings listed in your area here. (If you happen to be in the San Francisco Bay Area, you can join a screening being organized there by a great group of TEDsters. Please write to Taylor Milsal, milsal@gmail.com)


2) Host a screening. It could be in your home with a few friends and family. Or you could book a larger venue in your neighborhood and open it for others to come join. You'll just need a large TV screen, the right channel access (or a good Internet connection) and willingness to spend four hours as a global soul. The Pangea Day website has the details you need here. Make sure to add your screening to our fast-expanding global map.

3) Most important of all. Please help us spread awareness of Pangea Day. There are numerous ways to do this:

- Forward this email to your friends and colleagues... and invite them nicely to do the same!

- Post a story on your website or blog

- Point people to some or all of the following high-impact films:

The Pangea Day website and trailer.

The series of anthems sung by one country for another that I sent you earlier this week, e.g.

France sings for USA

Kenya sings for India

A viral Pangea Day film that debuted at TED this year.

- Make use of these ads on your website. We'd love to see millions of banners out there promoting the day.
- Use any contacts you have to get media coverage for Pangea Day. There are a lot of great angles to this story!
- You could even offer to take out paid advertising in your local media. We have terrific material for print, web and TV.
- Become a fan on Facebook by clicking here

Do please write and tell us what you've done (you can write to my colleague, TED Scribe Jane Wulf, jane@ted.com). We want to recognize and celebrate those who make inspired contributions to the day.

OK, that's the practical stuff. Do you have one more minute? I'd like to just say something more about why Pangea Day is worth your time and effort.

I think we can agree our world is becoming ever smaller/flatter/more inter-connected. An important consequence of this is that all of the issues that matter -- war, terrorism, poverty, disease, human rights, environment, climate change -- can only be tackled now from a global perspective. And yet the people supposedly trying to solve them are almost all serving narrow mandates on behalf of their nation, religion or tribe. There's a terrifying mismatch here between the nature of the problems and the means the world is deploying to tackle them. "The world" itself doesn't even seem to have a seat at the table.

But there's no reason this should be so. It is absolutely possible in the 21st century for us to begin a truly global conversation; to start nurturing that identity we share: one humanity. Some use the language of promoting global citizenship, or reducing cross-cultural suspicion, or expanding our circle of empathy, or eliminating the "us/them" mode of thinking. These goals are all linked, and any progress toward them is, I think, a very big deal.

I was brought up in an international boarding school in India with kids from more than 30 countries. We had a shared experience of each others' lives. Differences in color and race gradually faded.

I'm convinced today's media have the power to humanize "the other". To help people make the mental switch from "them" to "us". Telling stories through film is especially powerful in this regard. At the start of a film, you see someone strange-looking. At the end you feel kinship. There's no moral effort involved here. It's just a natural mental repositioning. Call me idealistic, but I really believe that that mental shift holds the key to our shared future.

Of course, May 10th won't lead to an outbreak of world peace. But I do think it will reveal a sense of possibility: the possibility that there are incredible new ways of using technology as a force for good; that peoples' minds are not locked in a dark place forever; that our global village can start the long journey from "us/them" to "we".

As the Pangea Day website says: Films can't change the world. But the people who watch them can.

Huge thanks from me, Jehane and Pangea Day's executive director Delia Cohen to all who have helped make this project possible, including scores of TEDsters, the amazing Pangea Day and TED teams, TED patrons Shawn and Brook Byers, website-creators Avenue A/Razorfish and our visionary sponsor Nokia.

Please join us for this final, crucial chapter.

Sincerely,

Chris Anderson
TED Curator

4/13/2008

La historia secreta de Silicon Valley. Como siempre, todo viene de la guerra

Desde hace muchos años, centros tecnológicos de todo el mundo están intentando replicar el modelo del Silicon Valley, esa especie de gallina de los huevos de oro de los últimos 50 años.

En este vídeo, Steve Blank narra de una forma amena y, en mi caso, sorprendente, cómo Stanford es la semilla que comienza a nutrir al valle de esta vena emprendedora. Os recomiendo fehacientemente que veáis el vídeo, es una hora que engloba historia de la Segunda Guerra Mundial, la guerra fría, tecnología y "secretos", todo a la vez. Pero también aprovecho para poner un breve resumen muy esquemático, de lo que viene a decir.



La historia de los comienzos del Silicon Valley se pueden resumir en dos personas. La primera es Fredrick Terman. Aunque es conocido por su papel como profesor y rector de Stanford, y por ser la persona que propuso a los estudiantes William Hewlett y David Packard que creasen una empresa, la realidad es un poco más complicada. Cuando el departamento americano de Defensa decide intervenir en la Segunda Guerra Mundial, también decide no utilizar únicamente sus laboratorios, sino emplear departamentos universitarios, creados específicamente o no para "la causa". En las primeras rondas de contactos, Terman ve cómo universidades como el MIT (con ayudas de 117 millones de dólares de la época), Caltech (83 millones) o Harvard/Columbia (30 millones) se llevan la pasta, mientras que Stanford recibe unos 50 mil dólares. Terman decide que esto no puede seguir así, y decide entender el porqué, así que llama a su director de tesis en el MIT (Vannevar Bush, a quien debo otro artículo, pero uno de cuyos trabajos principales fue descrito muy bien por el "Gaditano en el Silicon Valley"), quien le ofrece el puesto de director del "Harvard Radio Research Lab", un "spinoff" (derivación) del laboratorio de radiación del MIT. Este laboratorio secreto fue responsable de encontrar y entender la defensa aérea alemana, y aplicar teoría de señales y electrónica para ser capaz de interferir sus radares (el vídeo cuenta cómo lo consiguieron: ¡¡¡con papel de aluminio!!! Lo cuál explica por qué durante un tiempo no hubo casi papel de aluminio en Estados Unidos: tres cuartas partes de la producción se utilizaron en la guerra).

Tras la guerra, Terman tuvo claro que lo de Stanford no podía volver a ocurrir, así que creó un modelo de colaboración militar/universitario en Stanford, centrándose en estudios sobre microondas y electrónica, y construído en colaboración con el MIT. Aprovecha su estancia en el RRL para reclutar a 11 miembros, y crea un laboratorio que inicialmente, se ocupa de investigación básica y no clasificada (es decir, publicable). En 1950, Stanford se convierte en el MIT del oeste americano.

Y llega la guerra de Corea, y Terman crea entonces un departamento "clasificado" para colaborar con defensa, siendo la primera vez que Stanford es un socio del departamento de defensa al 100%, convirtiéndose en centro de excelencia para la NSA, la CIA y la marina.

Cuando Terman se convierte en rector, en 1955, es cuando cambia las normas universitarias, para provocar que los estudiantes creen nuevas empresas, que los profesores trabajen en consultorías externas y se sienten en sus consejos asesores, y simplifica la transferencia tecnológica y de propiedad intelectual. El objetivo: que Stanford siga siendo el centro de excelencia en defensa, y que en ningún momento haya falta de medios para conseguirlo. Esto crea un ecosistema de empresas como Granger Associates, Watkins Johnson o Sylvania (que sólo venden bombillas, ¿no?), que tienen un papel fundamental en la guerra de Corea y la guerra fría. El vídeo comenta algunos casos concretos, como el proyecto Melody o el Flower Garden que os recomiendo ver y escuchar.

La otra persona fundamental en esta historia es William Shockley, muy conocido como co-inventor del transistor, que le granjeó el premio Nobel en 1956, ... pero que inicialmente tuvo roles destacados en defensa, como por ejemplo director de la marina en guerra submarina. Shockley creó su empresa, Shockley Semiconductors, en 1955, que fue la primera empresa de semiconductores del Silicon Valley. Debido a su fama de gran investigador, pero inaguantable gestor, y por su decisión de no invertir más en investigación de semiconductores, ocho de sus mejores empleados (los "ocho traidores"), se van de la empresa y fundan sus propios negocios. Principalmente, Fairchild Semiconductor, que se convierte en un gigante que provoca la creación de muchas empresas a su alrededor. Otros dos (Noyce y Moore) fundan una pequeña empresa llamada... Intel. Otro, Kleiner, funda una empresa de inversión con su mismo nombre... y el Silicon Valley, tal y como lo conocemos actualmente, está formado.

Para bien o para mal, cómo están conformadas las relaciones entre universidad, empresa, defensa e inversores proviene de tiempos de guerra.